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You Don’t Need The Government To Tell You When To Pray

May 1, 2013

Seems to be a logical statement, right?  After all, that’s what separation of Church and State is all about.

So why are there groups that are hell-bent (no pun intended) in having the government tell you when and where to pray?  Whether it’s forcing all students to pray at certain government-proscribed times, in classrooms, and in front of all the other students (which many religious faiths have a serious issue with), or by telling you which days are the right “Days of Prayer”, it seems some are very comfortable with state-mandated and regulated expressions of faith.  This should be disturbing to anyone who wants the freedom to practice their own religion they see fit, especially these same groups who have not always had the freedom to do it themselves.

Thursday is the National Day of Prayer. If you want to pray that day, you are free to do so.  However, you’re free to pray (or not) any day.  Why should it be the government’s responsibility or concern?  As our parent organization stated:

At Americans United, we find the National Day of Prayer offensive for a number of reasons. In the first place, it violates the constitutional separation of church and state. Congress passed a federal law requiring the president to acknowledge the day. Most governors follow suit, thus giving Americans the false notion that elected officials have some sort of official role in religious matters.

In the second place, the NDP has been all but taken over by extreme Religious Right groups that use it to promote bad history, attack church-state separation and distort court rulings in this area.

Join us tomorrow at midday in the MN Capitol rotunda, where we will be talking about Church and State separation, why it’s vital in order to keep our religious diversity AND freedom alive and healthy, and why we support the “Day of Reason”.

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From → Action Alert, Events

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